Ken Clark

Big Bang
Pigment Ink on Canvas
100cmX50cmX2cm
2016
Birth
Pigment Ink on Canvas
100cmX50cmX2cm
2016
Conception
Pigment Ink on Canvas
100cmX50cmX2cm
2016
Fallopian Journey
Pigment Ink on Canvas
100cmX50cmX2cm
2016
Te Ika
Pigment Ink on Canvas
100cmX50cmX2cm
2016
Ozone-O2
Pigment Ink on Canvas
100cmX50cmX2cm
2016

Ken Clark, one of the few New Zealand artists to be selected for the ‘On Screen’ project at the Saatchi Gallery in London, was born in Christchurch, New Zealand in 1957. His early work has beenmainly in film and television as a film and videotape editor, animator and director. Ken has also tutored CGI and Stop Motion animation courses at Ara Institute of Canterbury/CPIT and wrote the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) approved course, ‘Introduction to 3D animation’ used by the National College of Multimedia and Technology. He has a Graduate Certificate in Design fromCPIT and a BFA (Hons) from Canterbury University. His artwork divides into two main areas, figurative and abstracted images, but both usually start with filmed or digitally captured images. The concepts of realty are foremost in his work. What I show is my visual interpretation of a reality and in my reality the viewer will always see their own reality.

Many, if not all, creation myths start with a sea, either literal or symbolic, and then light appears and life begins. There is even an equivalent scientific explanation of how ultraviolet rays caused the water atoms to split and create an atmosphere so life could exist on land. Water and light are essential for life. This series of prints is my investigation into the visual intersection of fluid and light effects and the conversation created by this interaction and the landscapes or mindscapes that evolve. In this series I have been influenced by Plato’s explanation of how we see; gentle fire coming from our eyes and combining with daylight to form a homogeneous “body of vision” so we can detect visual objects. The individual titles of the works reflect my “body of vision” which may be different from other viewers. With these, and nearly all of my work, no interpretation of what they represent is right or wrong.